#ContactForm1{display: none !important;}
clic on site index page to get started

Monday, 20 March 2017

The Times Feedback on what to call people over 60

Times readers write to the Feedback article about house style - the right or wrong way to write; a discussion between them and The Times. Much in the way I use hyphens and semi-colons.

This week it was about what to call people and things of a certain age (Rose Wild, March 18th, 2017). 'Getting a life' comes to mind. Cars' ageing classes are very precise and not to be mucked about with (veteran, classic and vintage). Human classification is more flexible. Experience and expertise influence the word used in addition to the amount of time involved. A veteran broadcaster for example may not have retired. Itoje, England's lock forward, is 'old beyond his years', which I think means precocious. The Times house style discourages 'old', 'aged' and 'elderly'. Here are some alternatives:

codger              a fish that lives underground, comes out at night and has TB
fart                    gaseous pelvic effluent or a committee member of a rugby or golf club
curmudgeon     a bird that reviews films
scrote               small, reclusive, wrinkled, unpleasant but has got balls
geriatric           mouse takes three wickets in three balls
grump              a tiger that bites your arse
grouch             exclamation when a tiger bites your arse
fogey               obscure green thing up your nose        
pensioner         he who writes letters on his mistress

We are not allowed to mention certain words but this opening
partnership's combined ages was more than the opposition's total
   
Anybody got any other suggestions?

No comments:

Post a Comment