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Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Shallilo-foreveryoung picks out some of the latest press offerings


Shallilo-foreveryoung browses through some interesting press items

Shallilo-foreveryoung
dave's inspiring ageing blog
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Tom Whipple reviewed The Order of Time by Carlo Rovelli in the Times Saturday Review April 14th. Whilst I won't buy book itself, Tom writes in his review about how theoretical physicists try to keep the interest of their audience. No one ever finishes. As with torture, everyone breaks. Having read Brian Cox, I have experience. I glossed over what I didn't understand and enjoyed the bits that made sense, as in the basic equation of life is really simple but what about the trillions of life forms that result? I got to the end. Tom also got to the end, aided by the notion that finishing is meaningless when reading a book about time.
  Sadly, for me, breaking point is not solely about physics. Wolf Hall is my most high profile example,  along with many other readers. There are websites devoted to the inability to read this book. I had to abandon a book on statistics, full of worked examples. I'd hoped for insights, not a reminder of failure. There are a few crime novels too, especially those with impossibly talented heroes, described as such in the first pages of the text as opposed to letting us realise how good they are through their actions. Better the gritty flawed Morse, Rhebus, Hole, Thorne etc.
  Perez is a nice guy though.

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The Times Nature Notebook by Jim Dixon on April 7th extols the virtues of the Cromford canal waterway habitat in Derbyshire. Most of the rural canal sections are similar. On our canal travels we have seen buzzards, kites, kingfishers and grass snakes and not even trying. They are great places.
  Eric Gehlhaar and I walked a bit of the Goyt Valley, home to the remains of the Cromford and High Peak railway, another brilliant match of history and countryside. The development of transport, from horse to barge to steam, replacing labour with capital, is a cornerstone of our history.
  All within an ace of Buxton - me and the childbride's favourite spot.

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Mozart, Haydn, and now ... Playstation music? by Jonathan Holmes in The Telegraph 12th April explains how to attract younger audiences to classical music. Many games have expensive orchestral accompaniments. 12 of the 300 Classic FM 2015 Hall of Fame pieces were video game scores. The channel now has High Score, a show dedicated to game music, presented by Jessica Curry.
  Composers have to write several versions to cope with the different options that a game throws up. So pretty cool and complex. There are well known composers: Jason Graves, John Cage, Philip Glass, Tommy Tallarico, Martin O'Donnell.
  The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra perform Uncharted 2:Among Thieves on May 30 at Royal Albert Hall.
  And yes I have listened to some of it, but not enough to comment.

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A coffee article on the BBC website, by Lora Jones.
  Brazil grow the most followed by Vietnam. Arabica and Robusta are commonest species.
  Finland and Sweden top the drinking list.
  Uk is the most expensive country in which to drink coffee.
  Starbucks and Costa are the commonest UK outlets.
  
Then a plug for the Fairtrade Foundation safeguarding the livelihoods of farmers.
You probably knew all this.

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